To Blog or Microblog, That is the Question

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“Blogging and the Internet allow us to engage in a lot more real time conversations as opposed to a one-way dump of information or a message.” ~Indra Nooyi (PepsiCo’s CEO)

What is a blog? What is a microblog?
Is Twitter a microblog?

Many of you reading this post most likely know what a blog is – in fact you’re reading a blog right now! Blogs started out as online diaries, but quickly found their way into the business arena. Today, businesses use blogs to reach the customer with interactive conversations. Businesses post blogs to share information with the customer, and in-turn customers can reply to businesses, ask questions, and get answers. Individuals even have their own blogs in which they talk about businesses. Businesses should pay attention to those posts – they can learn a lot! Blogs also help with search engine optimization.

Do you know what a microblog is? If you’ve ever been on Twitter you’ve been on a microblog. Twitter is a great way for companies to network. It is another way businesses can hold conversations with their customer and share information via links. With Twitter you’re limited to 140 characters, while bloggers try to keep their conversations to 500 – 800 characters.  But even though Twitter and blogs are different in some regards, they are very complimentary to each other. Mark Schaeffer explains it as “Twitter is the trailer to the blog’s movie.”

But why should a business (including vocational schools) use blogs and microblogs (in this case Twitter)? Because, as PepsiCo’s CEO, Indra Nooyi states, it allows us (the company) “to engage in a lot more real time conversations as opposed to a one-way dump of information or a message.” Think of the conversations you could have with your parents, students, and local employers through both Twitter and blogging?

Who’s currently using blogs and Twitter to connect with the vocational schools’ audiences?

In my previous blog, Fear of Using Social Media, I mention how only 13% of teachers use social media in the classroom. In this blog, I am looking at the use of social media (specifically Twitter and blogging) as a tool by vocational schools to communicate with their audience – students, parents, community, and employers – about the value of vocational schools and what they have to offer. Although I was unable to locate specific stats for this particular use, I did quick research of my own by visiting 17 Massachusetts vocational high school websites, to see which ones had a link to Twitter or a blog.  I was not surprised with the results.

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Data gathered by Lori Narewski in informal survey

Eleven schools had no links to any social media sites, five schools had links to Twitter (and sometimes Facebook or Instagram), and one had a link to Twitter that when clicked on brought me to my own Twitter page. None had a link to a blog.

What Are the Schools Tweeting?

Of the five ‘tweeting’ schools, all shared what was going on inside the doors of the school – which is important. However, only one shared links to what employers are saying or thanked businesses in the community for field trips and participating in the education of the students. This is a vital part of two-way conversations with the customer that businesses must be having. Businesses need to talk about more than themselves – they must find out what their customer is interested in and talk about that – and they must listen! It makes me think of the song “I Want to Talk About Me” song by Toby Keith – don’t make your customers feel like this!

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80-20 Rule Applies to Social Media Too!

Think of the 80-20 rule. Eighty percent of your posts should be simply connecting with the customer on topics and themes they are interested in, twenty percent are then “selling.” Gary Vaynerchuk refers it to a “jab, jab, jab, right hook,” in which “jabs are the value you provide your customers with: the content you put out, the good things you do to convey your appreciation. And the right hook is the ask: it’s when you go in for the sale, ask for a subscribe, ask for a donation.” In addition to the 80-20 rule, there are several additional tips to being successful with both blogs and Twitter.

Those tips will be provided in my next blog – we will be discussing seven ways to successfully blog and tweet and connect with your customer through building authentic relationships.

YOUR TURN…

Is your business blogging? Tweeting?
Are you  using the 80-20 rule?
Where do you think you need to make adjustments?

Please share your success here, and even your “need to improve” if you would like!

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